Victorian Poets (Bloom's Modern Critical Views) by Harold Bloom PDF

Teen Young Adult

By Harold Bloom

ISBN-10: 1604132760

ISBN-13: 9781604132762

The yank and British poets of the Victorian interval balanced culture and innovation, paving the way in which for the stylistic departures of modernism. The poets featured during this name contain Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Robert Browning; Rudyard Kipling; Christina Rossetti; Gerard Manley Hopkins; and Ralph Waldo Emerson. scholars learning this era in literature will locate this feature of severe essays priceless in realizing those poets and their works. An introductory essay via Harold Bloom, a bibliography, a chronology, and an index upload to this quantity.

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For brief discussions of women poets’ use of flowers, see Cora Kaplan, Salt and Bitter and Good: Three Centuries of English and American Women Poets (New York, 1975), pp. 20–24, and Alicia Ostriker, “Body Language: Imagery of the Body in Women’s Poetry,” in The State of the Language, ed. Leonard Michaels and Christopher Ricks (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1980), pp. 256–57. 11. Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam 6, l. 25, The Poems of Tennyson, ed. Ricks (London, 1969). 12. Ostriker discusses the remaking of old myths by twentieth-century women poets in “The Thieves of Language: Women Poets and Revisionist Mythmaking,” Signs 8 (Autumn 1982): 68–90.

We can formulate the problem like this: a man’s poem which contains a female self-projection shows two distinctly different figures, poet and projection; in a woman’s poem on the same model, the two would blur into one. Furthermore, it’s not really poets that are women, for the Victorians: poems are women. The cliché that the style is the man arises more readily and with much greater literalness and force when the stylist is a woman, and it is often charged with erotic intensity. The young lovers in Gilbert and The Damsel, the Knight, and the Victorian Woman Poet 25 Sullivan’s Iolanthe describe their perfect love by singing that he is the sculptor and she the clay, he the singer and she the song.

For brief discussions of women poets’ use of flowers, see Cora Kaplan, Salt and Bitter and Good: Three Centuries of English and American Women Poets (New York, 1975), pp. 20–24, and Alicia Ostriker, “Body Language: Imagery of the Body in Women’s Poetry,” in The State of the Language, ed. Leonard Michaels and Christopher Ricks (Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1980), pp. 256–57. 11. Alfred Tennyson, In Memoriam 6, l. 25, The Poems of Tennyson, ed. Ricks (London, 1969). 12. Ostriker discusses the remaking of old myths by twentieth-century women poets in “The Thieves of Language: Women Poets and Revisionist Mythmaking,” Signs 8 (Autumn 1982): 68–90.

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Victorian Poets (Bloom's Modern Critical Views) by Harold Bloom


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